Reading Building Blocks

The Five Components of Reading
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1. PHONEMIC AWARENESSThe knowledge and manipulation of sounds in spoken words.
Children need to be taught to hear sounds in words and that words are made up of the smallest parts of sounds, or phonemes. They need to recognize and use individual sounds to create words. 

Please see link below for suggestions on working with phonemic awareness at home.
Phonemic Awareness.pdf



2. PHONICS
The relationship between written letters and spoken sounds.

Children need to understand the relationship between written letters and spoken sounds.  They need to be taught the sounds of individual printed letters; as well as, groups of letters.  Knowing the relationship between letters and sounds helps children recognize familiar words accurately and automatically, and “decode” new words. 

Please see link below for suggestions on working with phonics at home.
Phonics.pdf



3. FLUENCY
The ability to read with accuracy,  appropriate rate, expression, and phrasing.
Children must develop the ability to read text accurately and quickly in order to understand what is read. When fluent readers read silently, they recognize words automatically. When fluent readers read aloud, they read effortlessly and with expression.  Readers who are weak in fluency read slowly, word by word, and spend so much effort decoding, that they miss the meaning of the text. 

Please see link below for suggestions on working with fluency at home.
Fluency.pdf



4.
 
VOCABULARY The knowledge of words, their definitions, and context.

It is very important for children to learn the meaning and pronunciation of words, and actively expand their knowledge of written and spoken words and how those words are used. The larger and stronger a child’s spoken vocabulary, the more background knowledge that child will bring to his or her reading experience.

Please see link below for suggestions on working with vocabulary at home.
ReadingVocabulary.pdf



5.COMPREHENSION The understanding of meaning in text.

Children need to acquire strategies to understand, remember, and communicate what they’ve read. Students who are in control of their own reading comprehension become purposeful, active readers. 

Please see links below for suggestions on working with comprehension at home.
Strategies to Support Comprehension.pdf
Compehension Fiction Texts.pdf
Comprehension Informational Texts.pdf